Utah Stories

Top 5 Utah Stories February 7th, 2024

Here are today’s top five stories. 1. Utah Lawmakers Reject Proposal to Expand Health Coverage to More Pregnant Women  2. Why Are There So Many Birds In Utah Lately?  3. Hybrid Charter Schools Are Using Virtual Reality To Teach Utah Kids  4. Davis County Seeking $30 Million To Build Homeless Resource Center  5. Utah lawmakers…

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Here are today’s top five stories.

  1. Utah Lawmakers Reject Proposal to Expand Health Coverage to More Pregnant Women 

A proposal to expand health coverage for Utah’s women is not moving forward. The bill was directed at low-income women and Rep. Ray Ward, R-Bountiful who sponsored the bill was “disappointed” that it wasn’t put into action. “I understand that we cannot provide every bit of health care to every person, and I don’t think we should try to do that,” Ward told KSL-TV in an interview Tuesday. “What things do I think we should provide out there? Coverage in pregnancy is on my list.” 

  1. Why Are There So Many Birds In Utah Lately? 

February is the best time of the year to see one of America’s most iconic birds here in Utah. Bald eagles fly to Utah in the winter to find food and escape colder conditions farther north. Other than bald eagles you can also spot starlings according to Fox News. “European starlings are particularly great at moving in the air,” said Anne Terry, the director of education at Tracy Aviary. “They’re aware of at least the seven closest birds around them at all times, which is why they’re able to do all of this without colliding in the middle,” said to Fox News. 

  1. Hybrid Charter Schools Are Using Virtual Reality To Teach Utah Kids 

The Utah State Charter School Board announced two new public charter schools will open in the near future with a unique, technology-centered approach to education according to Fox News. Thrive Point Academy of Utah and Virtual Horizons Charter School will be the first schools to use virtual reality in their curriculum. “Well, we’re really excited because it’s using the latest technology and virtual reality,” said Kristin Elinkowski, Board Chair of Virtual Horizons Charter School to Fox News. 

  1. Davis County Seeking $30 Million To Build Homeless Resource Center 

As reported yesterday on the top five, Kaysville residents are upset about a possible homeless shelter moving into the region. Davis County is asking the state legislature for $30 million to create said homeless shelter. As said on the show yesterday a bill was passed last year for a Code Blue response to the homeless crisis that often happens during the winter time. Davis County Commissioner Lorene Kamalu said to Fox News, “We want to get at the drivers of homelessness and not just try to put a band-aid over the challenge of homelessness that doesn’t even do anything. We want to have outcomes and people exiting the emergency shelters and becoming more stable,” she said. “Sometimes there’s a concept that if you build it, they will come. Well, it’s really important for people in Davis County to know that we’re not building something for people outside of our county to somehow then magically show up here. We are striving to stay upstream, and preventing homelessness, and for those who are experiencing homelessness to make it rare, brief and non-recurring, which is the State goal.” 

  1. Utah lawmakers pursue resolutions to honor Salvadorans, Pacific Islanders and refugees according to KSL 

Three resolutions meant to honor some of the newcomers and ethnic and racial minorities in the state, including Salvadorans and Pacific Islanders, are winding through the Utah Legislature according to KSL. The measures intended for support of Utah’s large Salvadoran and Pacific Islander population cost nothing. Nearly 13,600 Salvadorans or Salvadoran-Americans live in Utah, according to U.S. Census Bureau estimates as of 2021, though the Salvadoran Consulate in Salt Lake City estimates the number is around 20,000. The Salvadoran community is the second-largest Latino group in Utah — trailing the much larger Mexican and Mexican-American communities — and the third-largest Hispanic population in the United States.

Adventure of the Day: Pinto Arch in Moab 

Question of the Day: Is your sense of threat heightened after dark and what are your reasons for it?

A study led by BYU Public Health Professor Robbie Chaney and co-authored by Alyssa Baer and Ida Tovar shows how women at 4 different Utah campuses perceive a threat while walking after dark. Women focus on hazards along the edges of the path they walk, such as bushes and dark areas near the path. Men on the other hand do not perceive any safety threats and focus on the actual path, a light, or garbage cans.

*Content for this article curated from other sources.

*Featured image by Mehdi Sepehri .

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